Around the Neighborhood


A word on TETNA’s upcoming activities amid the coronavirus outbreak

UPDATE 12:50 P.M. MARCH 16: We are sad to announce we will be canceling this year’s Spring Egg Hunt given the legitimate concerns over the spread of the coronavirus and the uncertainty that remains with less than three weeks until the event. The CDC is now recommending that citizens avoid gatherings of 50 or more for the next eight weeks. The decision to cancel our popular Egg Hunt, though regrettable, is an obvious one at this point. Thanks to Ruckus & Glee for its support this year and for Maghan White for all her prep work. We hope to be able to offer another family-oriented event for our neighborhood later this year, as conditions allow. We’re in this together, East Tosa.

PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT FOLLOWS:

With many public gatherings being canceled or postponed this month in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus outbreak, Tosa East Towne Neighborhood Association would like to update our members and neighbors about the status of the several events planned for this spring.

Plans are still underway for Spring Egg Hunt on April 4, TETNA’s Annual Meeting on April 15, Run Tosa Run on May 16 and the TETNA Neighborhood Rummage Sale on June 6. At this time, we have not made any decisions to cancel or postpone any of these events, however, we realize that may become necessary depending on how the response to the coronavirus evolves between now and then.

We are hopeful that conditions will improve in time to proceed with our Spring Egg Hunt, but we will update you on the status of that and the other events as further decisions are made.

This is an unprecedented and difficult time, though with the precautions now being implemented by institutions and organizations throughout our community, the residents of Tosa East Towne can be part of efforts to minimize the impact of the virus. And although “social distancing” has been identified as part of this public health strategy, we hope residents will not forget their neighbors and will find ways to connect with and serve each other.

If you have ideas you’d like to share for ways Tosa East Towne can respond, please send them to info@tosaeasttowne.org. We hope to see you soon.

Some coronavirus resources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Wisconsin Department of Health Services

Wauwatosa School District

City of Wauwatosa


November is TETNA’s month to save at Metcalfe’s – again

Two years ago, Metcalfe’s Market chose TETNA for its “Give Back” program, in which community partners benefit when shoppers shop. We received $1,000 from Metcalfe’s through the program in November 2017, and the store has welcomed us back again this November, just in time for your Thanksgiving 2019 shopping.

The idea is simple: Use our 5% discount coupon when you shop at Metcalfe’s Market, 6700 W. State St., through Nov. 30, and Metcalfe’s will donate 5% of your total back to us, up to a cumulative $1,000. And the coupon is good for EVERY time you visit Metcalfe’s in November.

Tosa East Towne Neighborhood Association is grateful to Metcalfe’s Market for choosing us as its community partner once again.

Tips for using coupon:


City OKs new signs on Tosa East Towne lampposts

Zack Goerhner's design

Zack Goerhner’s design was selected for Tosa East Towne’s lamppost signs.

A year ago, we asked for the neighborhood’s support of adding new signs to several of our lampposts, and the response was tremendous, helping us raise more than $2,500 for the project.

We ran into some delays in getting the city to response to our request for installation, but in August, the Wauwatosa Board of Public Works approved our sign design and cleared the way for at least 49 of our signs on the lampposts around the neighborhood.

We’re grateful to all who donated to our campaign and for the great design work of Zack Goehner. We look forward to providing updates on installation as we continue to work though the process with the city.


How to throw a Tosa Block Party

Neighborhood Tic Tac Toe

Imagine your house in the center of a Tic Tac Toe board

How many of your neighbors do you know? How well do you know them? Imagine your house as the center square of a Tic Tac Toe board and the surrounding squares are all your neighbors. Of the eight houses surrounding yours, how many names do you know? (Those houses behind you sure can be tough.) Do you know anything about your neighbor that isn’t apparent from the outside of the house (i.e. John likes to garden, Mary likes to cook)?

A block party is the perfect opportunity to meet and get to know your neighbors. By knowing who lives on your block you can know who might need a little extra help from time to time, find out about the neighborhood’s history from those who have been there for a longer time, and know what skills your neighbors can share. Having some fun with your neighbors can increase the sense of belonging within our community and facilitate neighbors looking out for one another.

Types of Block Parties

Any option (or combo of options) can work, but keep it simple:

  • BBQ – Someone brings the grills, everyone brings their own meat
  • Picnic – Everyone brings their own food
  • Pot luck – Everyone brings a dish to share
  • Catered – Everyone shares the cost to let someone else do the work

Location

Public spaces are best, as it increases the sense of community and shared responsibility for the event:

  • Street or alley (permit required)
  • Backyard
  • House
  • Garage

Timing

You’ll need to plan ahead, especially if you want to use the street (permit application is due 3 weeks prior to the event). Have a couple of dates in mind as you go around to notify neighbors because adjustments may need to be made if neighbors have conflicts. Per city ordinance, block parties are allowed until 10 p.m. Every year during the first week of August the City of Wauwatosa and Wauwatosa Police Department host Tosa Night Out, which is “designed to build and sustain community police partnerships that have a lasting impact on the quality of life for Wauwatosa’s residents, businesses, and visitors.” In recent years that large community event has been paired with a encouragement to neighbors to hold their block parties on the weekend prior to the event. If you are struggling to determine when to hold your block party, we strongly suggest participating in the lead up to Tosa Night Out.

Wauwatosa Block Party Permit

If you are hosting a block party in the street, remember that a permit is required. Petition forms can be obtained at the Police Department Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. at the front desk, or you can download a Block Party Permit Application/Petition. The petition for a permit must be returned to the Police Department a minimum of 3 weeks prior to the block party. Not only do signatures from all neighbors need to be obtained, but all non-residential establishments within the area that would be impacted by the street closing need to be notified. The cost for the permit is free, however the permit includes a few options for barricades for a modest fee.

  • For a $35 fee (payable with your application) the Public Works Department will deliver two (2) barricades before the party and at the conclusion of the party with placement of barricades on curb area the City truck and crew will pick up the barricades the following work day.
  • Block party banners are available from Community Support on a first come, first served basis with a $25 deposit that will be returned when you return the banner.

Getting the word out

The whole point is to meet your neighbors, so going door-to-door is always best. Flyers can be also be used for planning with a request that neighbors return their suggestions to the organizer(s) and again once the block party details have been determined.

Set up

Consider using a sign-in book to help plan for next year, which can also be used as a contact list to distribute to the participants. Name tags can also be helpful (first name/last name/house number), you may be meeting a lot of new people, and remembering names is hard. Be sure to have plenty of tables, chairs, plates, cutlery, cups, and beverages. Don’t forget to wheel out a couple of garbage cans to make clean-up easier. Be considerate to your neighbors and ask if its OK to bring your dog out too. Make sure there are going to be enough people hanging around until the end to help clean up. Near the end of the night, talk about what worked, what didn’t, and any new ideas.

Block Party Activities

Food and drinks usually are the primary focus, but there are plenty of other things to consider. Kids (and many adults) appreciate games like egg/water balloon toss, sack races, volleyball/badminton, etc. (Prizes can help encourage participation, anything from dollar-store gag gifts to a trophy that travels to the annual winning house). Bouncy houses can be rented for very reasonable rates. The whole point is to get to know your neighbors, so make time to introduce one another and point out your house. This can be done informally, or in game format.  Whether it’s a portable speaker with tunes, a neighbor paying the guitar or even a band, music can really liven the party. Be sure to invite the Police Department, Fire Department and your alderman. They can provide safety and neighborhood updates and maybe even arrange to have a fire engine stop by.

Final Reminders

  • Block parties are only only allowed until 10 p.m.
  • Emergency vehicles may still need access, so don’t block the street in any way that can’t easily be moved.
  • You may want to post signs or send out a notice the day before the event to remind everyone to remove cars.
  • HAVE FUN!

[Adapted from “Neighborhood Block Party Kit” distributed by the City of Edmonton Community Services Department]


Design selected for new Tosa East Towne lamppost signs

Tosa East Towne Neighborhood Association received 515 responses to its survey seeking residents’ input on a design for new lamppost signs in our neighborhood. Each of our six finalists received dozens of first-place votes, but there was one clear leader, the colorful design submitted by Tosa East Towne native Zack Goehner.

Zack Goerhner's design

Zack Goehner’s design was selected for Tosa East Towne’s lamppost signs.

Thanks to all who participated in our survey, and congratulations to Zack. The TETNA board at its February meeting approved his design for our lamppost signs.

UPDATE: We have reached our fundraising goal! Thanks to everyone who contributed.

Zack, 34, grew up on 64th and Meinecke, and after leaving town to live in Seattle for about 10 years he moved back to the neighborhood last year “so my kids could be closer to their grandparents.”

“I have been inspired creatively by our neighborhood since childhood,” Zack told TETNA. “I had countless sketches of our house and crayon-drawn maps of our streets. So I’m forever grateful to have had an opportunity to contribute to our neighborhood through art.”

Here’s how he describes the idea for his winning sign design:

“The design was inspired by the majestic rows of bungalows that stand throughout our neighborhood — Tosa East Towne’s signature aesthetic and symbols of our closeness as neighbors. I tried to capture the enchanting colors and shapes that appear when the first and last light of the day hits our streets. The signs will be a warm welcome: unique and colorful, just like we are.”

You can find more works in his portfolio at braveappliance.com.

TETNA will discuss ordering and installing the signs at its next meeting, at 7 p.m. March 12 at Center Street Park Pavilion. All are welcome to attend.